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Political Changes, Online Crime Increases, Overland Flooding Competition, AIC Update

Posted By Thom Young, June 2, 2015

To Quote Shrek, “Change is good, donkey”


When it comes to change, I’ve always sat with the optimists. Change of any sort can be disruptive and difficult for some, but it always brings with it new perspectives and new opportunities. Analyzing the effect of change in your marketplace gives you a competitive advantage, particularly if your competitors are slow to react or quick to react in the wrong manner. Being the first one with a positive message will always win you more credibility than harping about the difficulties the change will bring. Change is inevitable in all things; dealing with it is your only option. How you deal with it will determine how it affects you.

The political front is certainly a different landscape before us in Alberta. Doubtless, people had more than enough of the ruling regime and demanded change. You can debate whether or not the change they have effected is the kind of change they wanted, but that won’t change the outcome. The popular vote certainly did not go to the new ruling party but, with the right of centre divided and the left of centre united, the first past-the-post outcome in this three-horse race was assured almost from the get go. In a democracy, the will of the people cannot be denied, and we will have to deal with whatever changes are produced on that account.

The insurance industry will experience a number of years of trepidation. The NDP perspective on auto insurance is a threat to our businesses, and a hard market (should it arise even for a short period of time) would bring the political forces to bear upon this issue. Unfortunately, auto insurance wasn’t part of the discussion in this past election, and one would believe this topic presents no immediate threat. Our industry in Alberta has never faced this kind of threat before, so it would be wise to begin to prepare and strategize for possibility of the discussion. Interesting times?

One might observe though that the previous government wasn’t as kind to us as we all thought it should be. Premium roll backs on auto insurance were somewhat disruptive, not to mention financially difficult for us. Brokers in particular had to suffer commission charge backs, often arriving in a different fiscal period. The return of money spent because of a misguided belief that the public had been mistreated by rates was more than a minor inconvenience to many brokerages. That, followed by the introduction of auto insurance reforms that continue to interfere in the natural competitive market for auto insurance in Alberta, doesn’t support the notion that a right-of-centre government is better for our circumstances than the new incoming one.

Those of us who have registry offices have direct experience with the ineptitude of the previous government. A succession of nearly a dozen different ministers has proven a lack in the simple understanding of the challenges of running a business where your revenues are limited by regulations while your expenses increase unchecked. Registry agents have been doing their best to convince the government that fees charged the public should be adjusted through a fee model taking into account the factors that affect revenues and expenses. While the model is logical from a business perspective, for over 10 years the service fee received by registry agents has remained the same even while the government has increased its fees substantially over the same period. Considering just the increases in rents and salaries in Alberta over this 10-year period, it impossible to understand why requests for fee increases to account for these fell on deaf ears, particularly from a government that is supposed to be cognizant and supportive of business issues. I don’t believe you’d find too many registry agents who felt that the previous government was their “friend.” Who knows what’s in store for these businesses under the new government? The success of the registry agent service-delivery system in Alberta is the idol of governments everywhere. Will the government follow the principle that, if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it? We will have to wait and see.

I for one am looking for the new opportunities that will present themselves to us in short order.

Online Crime Continues to Increase


phishingRecently, an item circulated purporting to be from the Canadian Revenue Agency asking for credit card information in order to deposit your tax refund directly to your credit card account. This followed recent notices from CRA that the office would like to do away with cheque refunds and have you initiate a direct deposit for your refunds. CRA has a great site for this—safe, secure, and easy to use. Unfortunately, the email purporting to be from CRA wasn’t from CRA. The link took you to a site that sure looked like CRA’s but, of course, was a new twist on an old internet scam called phishing. An email purporting to be from a bank or insurance company asks you to click on a link and confirm your data. Once you do so, the data you input is stolen in a form of identity theft. Every day people are caught in this scam and the thought is always the same: “It looked real.” Well, that’s the point.

Protecting Canadians from online crime, new laws are now in effect and bring new rules about data management and cooperation with investigations. Still, other than on TV, law enforcement officials who are the least bit interested in investigating this kind of crime or have any of the skills necessary to actually do so are hard to find. Focusing on the most heinous of crimes involving distribution of images and abuse of children, these new laws are the first step to bringing actual legal discipline to our new communication technology, but we are a long way from consequences.

My advice on this remains the same. Unless you initiate the contact and are on a secure website indicated by the lock symbol, put none of your information on the internet. If in doubt, call the company and verify they are who they are. The electric company won’t even talk to you about your account without verifying who you are by asking you questions. You should not have more trust in the process than they have. Verify and confirm—sensitive information should be shared only when you are certain you are sharing it with the right people.

People caught up in the so-called CRA phishing scam gave out their SIN number, name, address, birth date, and credit card data—all the information necessary to begin the process of identity theft. The consequences of this might not be discovered for years. Don’t get caught by this.

The First Competitive Response to Overland Flooding Coverage


As has been predicted, the markets’ response to the Aviva overland flood coverage has seen a new entry in Alberta with the Co-operators’ announcements last week.

The broker side has some new competition through this product from the direct writers. We are still awaiting updates from other markets on this, but this announcement is certain to put additional competitive pressure on them. If anyone has heard any current rumours, I would be interested in hearing about them.

AIC Stakeholder Sessions Have Been Completed


AIC stakeholder sessions were held in the past two weeks in both Edmonton and Calgary. I attended only the Calgary meeting but had updates on the issues raised in Edmonton. It was nice to see that the very vocal life-insurance minority who had been clamoring for relaxed entrance standards determined to let these meetings pass without making a spectacle of themselves once again. It was also nice to see the interest from the General Insurance community expressed on the examination and education issues. Updates were provided on the efforts underway to improve the pass/fail rates on the examinations without reducing the standards of education needed to both enter our business and advance within it. The process of establishing equivalencies for professional designation holders and matching education providers' courses to other jurisdictions was discussed as well. Two General Insurance sub-committees are working hard on these issues and hope to provide actionable decisions on both issues by the end of July. If you have opinions on these matters and would like to ensure that they are brought to the attention of the people working on these issues, please don’t hesitate to forward them to me. As a sitting member of the General Insurance Council, I will be happy to ensure that your thoughts on these issues are heard.

The AIC also reported on the licensing cycle, which is well under way. If you haven’t received an email from the AIC on this matter, you’re not recorded properly in the system. All license holders are personally responsible to ensure that their licenses are in good standing before they represent themselves to the public. This means your Continuing Education Credits need to be up to date, your declarations made, and your licensing fee paid by the end of June or you are not eligible to receive compensation for selling insurance. Make this process a priority, people.

I’d like also to mention that you are now required to know your CIPR number. This number identifies you across most Canadian jurisdictions and enables things like your CE credits to be followed wherever you are licensed. Your CE certificate now requires your CIPR identification, so all education providers are asking for it. Make you know what it is and have it with you when you are signing the attendance sheets.

In Closing


Summer is almost here. Time to go for a bike ride!

The opinions expressed in this blog are not necessarily those of IBAA.
Comment on this post below or email Thom Young privately. Thom also encourages suggestions for topics.

Tags:  Alberta Insurance Council  Aviva  broker channel  CIPR numbers  CRA  direct writer channel  insurance license renewal process  licensing courses and exams  NDP and insurance  online crime  overland flood insurance  phishing  The Co-operators 

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